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Sculpture (MA)

Ioana Maria Sisea

Ioana Sisea (born 1988) is a Romanian artist working across varied media. Her work explores issues such as social perceptions of the body, relationships, family and memory.

She often objectifies specific elements of a memory or interaction, removing them from their original context and the unchallenged prejudices that it may have permitted. Sisea is largely medium agnostic and adopts modes of expression that best suit the conceptual basis of each work. 

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Degree Details

School of Arts & Humanities

Sculpture (MA)

" My practice focuses on womanhood and human relationships as experienced in private life, touching upon topics like motherhood, family, love and personal history. I like to explore the meaning that we ascribe to words and objects and how it reveals our cultural values and metaphysical beliefs. 

I construct new objects that imitate real possessions or objects from certain cultural backgrounds. I do this to modify the meaning of items. By recreating items from scratch, I can explore their emotional impact; I can transform abstract, often uncontrollable sensations of memory into finite objects. I thereby simplify an emotional relationship with the past events that they embody. " 

Mermaids spinning 1
Mermaids spinning 2
Mermaids spinning 3
Mermaids spinning 4

Mermaids is a multimedia installation composed of films, drawings, resin and sculptures.

The work draws references from the representation of Mermaids in different traditions ranging from medieval folklore to Disney movies.

Although Mermaids have conventionally contributed to the objectification of women in different societies and therefore provide sociological insights, this project focuses more on their visual depiction and construction to create new fictions with them.

The drama of screaming mouths, running eyes, extended arms, fish tails, mute underwater screams, ridiculous despair and sadistic laughter is contrasted with the sanitised innocence of non-urbanised, pure and natural beings who are virginally appropriate for high status men.

These different mythologies are incorporated in a non-narrative, non-linear way to build the bodies of the mermaids into combinations of pop colours and ancient expressions of torture and contempt

Medium:

Plasticine
Experimental filmsFictionSculpture

Two mermaids

Two mermaids

Four mermaids

Mermaids

Mermaids is a multimedia installation composed of films, drawings, resin and sculptures.

The work draws references from the representation of Mermaids in different traditions ranging from medieval folklore to Disney movies.

Although Mermaids have conventionally contributed to the objectification of women in different societies and therefore provide sociological insights, this project focuses more on their visual depiction and construction to create new fictions with them.

The drama of screaming mouths, running eyes, extended arms, fish tails, mute underwater screams, ridiculous despair and sadistic laughter is contrasted with the sanitised innocence of non-urbanised, pure and natural beings who are virginally appropriate for high status men.

These different mythologies are incorporated in a non-narrative, non-linear way to build the bodies of the mermaids into combinations of pop colours and ancient expressions of torture and contempt.

Medium:

Ink on paper

Size:

50 x 70

Mermaids

Mermaids

Mermaids

Mermaids

Mermaids is a multimedia installation composed of films, drawings, resin and sculptures.

The work draws references from the representation of Mermaids in different traditions ranging from medieval folklore to Disney movies.

Although Mermaids have conventionally contributed to the objectification of women in different societies and therefore provide sociological insights, this project focuses more on their visual depiction and construction to create new fictions with them.

The drama of screaming mouths, running eyes, extended arms, fish tails, mute underwater screams, ridiculous despair and sadistic laughter is contrasted with the sanitised innocence of non-urbanised, pure and natural beings who are virginally appropriate for high status men.

These different mythologies are incorporated in a non-narrative, non-linear way to build the bodies of the mermaids into combinations of pop colours and ancient expressions of torture and contempt.

Medium:

Resin and plasticine

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